Traveling Exhibit

WE ARE STILL HERE AND THIS IS OUR STORY

A group exhibit co-curated and featuring work by Indigenous women artists to honor and advocate for our nations Missing and Murdered Indigenous People.

We are Still Here and This is Our Story is an impactful exhibit intended to bring awareness to our nation’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous People (MMIP). This crisis is prevalent and widespread in North America yet its significance has been diminished for far too long. Montana currently has the highest rate of missing and murdered Indigenous people in the United States. There are currently 243 people documented as missing or murdered, a figure that is considered low due to underreporting and inadequate data. Of these cases, 86% are unsolved. The fight for recognition and support continues. As a nation have a duty to speak out against these injustices and to the widespread loss of human life.

The Emerson has provided a platform for these women artists to share their stories through contemporary art, beadwork, and fashion design. MMIP has impacted the entire Indigenous community with too many experiencing losses first hand. We invite you to visit these exhibits, learn more about MMIP, and support the efforts to raise awareness in your local community and worldwide.

CURRENT LOCATION

Check back soon for more information about where this exhibit is currently on display and how you can view it.

Thank You!

This exhibit is made possible through the generosity and support of these sponsors:

MMIP Exhibit

PARTICIPATING WORK

By Monica Gilles-Brings Yellow - Monica Gilles-Brings Yellow paints from historical images, offering a platform to discuss the resilience, importance, and impact the Native peoples in works have had on present day society...

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By Olivia Rose Williamson - The pieces represented in this exhibition were created as an honor and homage to Missing and Murdered Indigenous People. The crisis has affected her family personally with her younger brother...

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By Olivia Rose Williamson - Description coming soon.

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By Olivia Rose Williamson - Olivia Rose Williamson incorporates painted shells, her own unique flower pattern design, gold findings, and intricate bead work to set her work apart. These pieces were created to honor and homage to Missing and Murdered Indigenous People...

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By Olivia Rose Williamson - Olivia Rose Williamson incorporates painted shells, her own unique flower pattern design, gold findings, and intricate bead work to set her work apart. These pieces were created to honor and homage to Missing and Murdered Indigenous People.

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By Rebekah "Carries Sweet Grass Woman" Jarvey - Rebekah’s work in display, “Pimatsoun (Spirital Life) Mask” is made with size 11 cut beads, size 11 neon lined crystal beads, black velvet material, 100 % cotton floral beaded material, brass spots, brass cones...

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By Susan Stewart - "My recent pieces for this exhibit reflect how I have endured great loss as an elder of my loved ones and the impact of the loss of our young people due to violence. It has brought such pain to our families and our communities..."

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By Grace & Cedar Bulltail - This cap and gown were made for Kaysera Stops Pretty Places who would have graduated last May. She went missing a few days after her 18th birthday in August of 2019, and her body was found two weeks later. Her aunties, Cedar and...

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By Salisha Old Bull - This work is about land with no boundaries and historic forms of art, in the form of pictographs. Hands with natural pigments seem to act as place markers or a sign of Indigenous presence. The combined concepts are...

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By Wozek Chandler - "Unfinished Disorder" recognizes those individuals who have been murdered and those still missing. The frame represents those individuals’ families and what they go through when their loved one is lost to the epidemic of MMIP. Everything...

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By Nayana LaFond - “This series began as a form of healing and a means to cope and process with my own experiences with domestic violence. What began as one painting, “Lauraina in RED”, has become a potentially never-ending project. On May 5, 2020 while..."

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